Spondylolisthesis Exercise – Prone Hover (video)

spondylolisthesis prone hover exercise

The prone hover or “plank” is a commonly prescribed spondylolisthesis and spondylolysis exercise that helps to build stability and strength in the mid-section and hips.  When performed correctly it helps the individual to build a great base and support system for the back.

However, this exercise is performed incorrectly more often than not. Those who perform this exercise tend to make one of three major mistakes which can lead to bad habits, increased pain, and failure to develop what this exercise is intended to do.

In the video below I discuss what these three mistakes are and how you can avoid them to perform this great exercise the right way.

As always, read our disclaimer and make sure you are cleared by your medical professional before trying out any new exercise.  Remember, not every exercise is made for everybody. Do not perform if it causes discomfort or increased pain.

Spondylolisthesis Exercise – Prone Hover

Common Mistake #1 : Clinching of your fists & holding the breath

  • Relax your hands and use a “flat hand” approach.
  • Fist clinching leads to tension and stress in the shoulders and chest, not the intended area of the mid-section and hips.
  • Fist clinching also leads to holding of the breath. A big no-no due to the compensations that occur while holding the breath.

Common Mistake #2: Improper positioning of the elbows

  • Elbows should be directly under the shoulders.
  • If elbows are out of position, stress is altered and it can lead to poor technique.
  • Poorly positioned elbows can also lead to this exercise causing shoulder pain.

Common Mistake #3: Poor positioning of the hips

  • Hips should be in-line with the shoulders.
  • Sagging hips lead to increased stress on the low back.
  • Keep hips nuetral from side-to-side as well. Do not let your left or right side sag lower than the other.

Now that you know how to perform the exercise properly, it is important to begin with a set and rep pattern that you can master. You do not want something too hard at the beginning.

  • Start with 6 sets of 10 seconds. Once mastered without pain and improper technique progress.
  • Move to 3 sets of 20 seconds. Once mastered without pain and improper technique progress.
  • Move to 3 sets of 30 seconds. Once mastered without pain and improper technique…..Congrats!

Keep working on this time for a few weeks and you will be ready for the next progression. It is O.K. to work for longer holding times AS LONG as technique stays perfect.  We like to add progressions to make the exercise harder instead of adding more time.

Comment below and let us know how this exercise works for you!

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